I tend to write late at night after I get out of work, but Sunday(or what feels like yesterday for me), was the beginning of what some like to call Holy Week. The week leading up to the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ.

Palm Sunday is particularly important, Because it’s about the triumphal entry, the arrival of the King, the Son of God. When writing, Matthew is aware of this, and the signifance of the prophecy in Zechariah 9:9/Matthew 21:5

 ““Say to the daughter of Zion,
‘Behold your King is coming to you,
Gentle, and mounted on a donkey,
Even on a colt, the foal of a beast of burden.’ ””
https://ref.ly/Mt21.5;nasb95

Jesus, and the people of Jerusalem knew, that the prophesied king, the son of David, the Messiah, was to enter into Jerusalem in a very particular way. That particular way, was mounted on a donkey, even on a colt, and that is why the people are so excited or reacting the way they are when He’s walking in. They know what this means, and they’ve been waiting for it for a very long time, they’re oppressed by the Romans, and they’re waiting for their King to deliver them, and here He is as prophesied,  entertains Jerusalem on a donkey. This is the reason it’s called Palm Sunday, because as Jesus was riding in on a donkey/colt,

“Most of the crowd spread their coats in the road, and others were cutting branches from the trees and spreading them in the road.”
https://ref.ly/Mt21.8;nasb95

The people were literally so excited at Jesus’ entering into Jerusalem that they were literally laying their coats in the road as He walked in to the city, and they were cutting branches, palm branches, and spreading them in the road, often times this is often depicted with them waving the branches at Jesus as well, signifying His royalty, but even this entry is showing his kingship, and that the people are honoring and exalting Him as He enters into Jerusalem.

The crowds also began to shout,

““Hosanna to the Son of David;
Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord;
Hosanna in the highest!””
https://ref.ly/Mt21.9;nasb95

This is somewhat of a stunning statement whether we realize it or not, the crowds were literally calling Jesus a king, someone from the line of David, especially his son, was known to be part of the bloodline of a line of Kings which the Lord said would never be broken, so to call Jesus the Son of David, is to call Him King. They’re also openly aware of, and acknowledging the fact that He’s coming in the name of the Lord; that He’s God sent, that He is a King sent by God. Those who were celebrating his triumphal entry could not have been more right. So much so, that in Luke’s Gospel it made the Pharisees mad.

The Pharisees responded to this crowds procession with,

“Some of the Pharisees in the crowd said to Him, “Teacher, rebuke Your disciples.””
https://ref.ly/Lk19.39;nasb95

Jesus’ response, however, was all the more better,

“But Jesus answered, “I tell you, if these become silent, the stones will cry out!””
https://ref.ly/Lk19.40;nasb95

The Pharisees were angry that Jesus’ disciples were crying out that He was a king sent by God to the city of Jerusalem, but they could not have been more accurate, and it shows God’s ordained fulfillment of this prophecy, and just how much satan was using the Pharisees, and how much it sounds like those who speak against the validity of Jesus these days, Jesus said that even if His disciples became silent the stones would cry out. That’s because, this was the rightful kings entrance into His city, His Holy City, and it should have been celebrated, and why should Jesus rebuke those who are calling out and celebrating the truth? Our king entered Jerusalem over 2000 years ago on Palm Sunday, and this coming Sunday will be the anniversary of His resurrection, the forgiveness of our sins, and His ascension in to Heaven to sit at the right hand of the Father, and praise be to God for all of those things, and may we celebrate Jesus’ entry and kingship in our lives.

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